Welcome to Vastspace, provides Reliable Web Hosting since 2014

Welcome to Vastspace

Archive

Cloud server vs VPS

Cloud server vs VPS

Both the Cloud server and a VPS are fundamentally the same. They are virtualized, but in terms of function, they cloud be different. Operating both the cloud server of the VPS are the same, you do need special skill on a cloud server or a VPS.

The major difference is the storage. When you are labelling your service as cloud means the guest machine will move to another host when the resided host has failed. VPS works directly with the local storage.

If the resources are spread to a few hosts like MySQL, Web Server, Tomcat, etc are known as cloud hosting. They could be confusing especially to a beginner. So Cloud server is better? In a certain way, yes if your instance has failed. The guest machine (Cloud server) will move to another host.

There are more points of failure for a cloud server set up. The setup requires more equipment, costs are higher and there are more interconnects. So it is quite a debatable question which is better. Most importantly, you have a backup and you can restore quickly.

However, I reckon a VPS might perform better at the same CPU class due to the shared storage. Even it is a fibre connection, it will definitely cost more. In the industry, many providers jump into the bandwagon using the word ‘cloud’ on their services to get more people to sign up.

As a consumer, we need to ask more pre-sales question if you are buying a ‘Cloud’ service, it could be misleading. Anyway, you can know more about the service what you are paying.

Protected from RDP Bruteforce

You might not have been aware that Kaspersky Endpoint Security comes default for our Microsoft Windows Cloud Servers and Dedicated servers which included Intrusion Detection System, and now it has an ability to detect RDP (Remote Desktop Protocol) brute-force attack attempts.
Hacking an RDP-connection is very lucrative: once an attacker gets login-password pair for RDP, he or she effectively owns the system where the RDP server is installed. Attackers can then plant malicious software in the affected system, exfiltrate data, etc. He (or she) also can gain access to your company internal network, given that the “penetrated” workstation is connected to it, or attempt to check out all of the passwords in the browser installed on the affected system. Opportunities are multiple, and the consequences can be dire.