Welcome to Vastspace, provides Reliable Web Hosting since 2014

Welcome to Vastspace

Archive

NVMe, SSD and M.2

NVMe, SSD and M.2

Most people currently understand what precisely a Solid State Drive (SSD) is and most likely have got one mounted in your notebook.

Opposed to a regular spinning hard drive, an SSD is much more quickly – which usually is why we suggest putting in an SSD as the ideal way to boost the overall performance of an older computer system, laptop computer or server.

The fact that is right up until we started out trying to play around with the new SSD standard – the NVMe M.2 SSD.

The new way to boost your server overall performance is installing an NVMe M.2 SSD. NVMe is an abbreviation for “Non-Volatile Memory Express” and is the latest standard protocol for being able to access high-speed storage media and it has many strengths compared to legacy standards.

An NVMe disk drive is also an SSD, but rather of hooking up it via a SATA III cable, it plugs straight into the motherboard via the M.2 PCIe slot, or in a regular PCIe slot working with an M.2 PCIe Adapter.

The M.2 part refers to the form factor and so how the drive attaches to the mainboard. Surprisingly, the disk drive is just about the size of a stick of RAM memory. And whilst an SSD will significantly boost the overall performance over a regular spinning hard drive, an NVMe M.2 is smoking fast in comparison, we can get 3,000 Mb/s in PCIe 3.0 x 4.

A common mistake of choosing a dedicated server?

What is the common mistake of choosing a dedicated server? Does size matter? Or the price is a matter. Basically, we put them into 2 categories; the value and the performance.

From my past experience, customers are looking at the disk size and the RAM. Yes, the more the merrier but this most time doesn’t help in performing but larger in quantity. For me. I will go with performance than value.

A 2.6Ghz CPU A if different to 2.6Ghz CPU B. CPU B have the same speed but it is the later generation consumes 30 watts while CPU A use 60 watts. It means performs better and consumes power lesser.

Next, we come to storage, we have hard drives, SSDs and NVMe now. Even the Hard  Drives are different. The slower one spins at 5400rpm, follow by 7200rpm, 10,000rpm and 15,000rpm. The spin speeds give you better read and write performance. SSD reads at about 500Mb per second and NVMe is 2000MB per second. Hard Drives, the most common is 7200rpm gives you 150Mb.

So, today you got a big hard drive which means you can store more but the server can only host 2 websites as compared to those with SSD 3 time more for the same website loading speed.

For a dedicated server, the priority should be the power, the performance unless you use it for files archiving and you need the pace. A website with images probably less than 10GB if you have a 6TB server, I will guess you used it for archiving.

On the other hand, big hard drives like 4TB are common now, who sells you 1 or 2 TB drives. Most probably, they are old stock if they do. The spin speed is still important if you stick with the hard drives., otherwise SSD at least.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Why SAS Hard Drives are better

At Vastspace, we insist on only SAS Hard Drives or Enterprise SSDs for our servers. It’s because SAS Hard Drives are the most reliable, maintain their performance under more difficult conditions, and perform much better than compares to either Near Line SAS or SATA disks.

In reliability, SAS hard drives are an order of magnitude safer than either Near Line SAS or SATA disks. The metric is measured in bit error rate (BER), or how often bit errors may occur on the media. With SAS hard drives, the BER is generally 1 in 10^16 bits. Read differently, that means you may see one bit error out of every 10,000,000,000,000,000 (known as 10 quadrillion) bits. By comparison, SATA drives have a BER of 1 in 10^15 (1,000,000,000,000,000 or 1 quadrillion). Although this does make it seem that SATA disks are pretty reliable, when it comes to absolute data protection, that factor of 10 can be major.

SAS hard drives are also built to more exacting standards than other kind of hard drives. SAS hard drives have a mean time between failure (MTBF) of 1.4 million hours or higher compared to 1 million hours or lower for most SATA hard drives.

Here’s a good article on Choosing Between SAS vs. SATA Hard Disk for Your Server RAID System from Intel: http://download.intel.com/support/motherboards/server/sb/enterprise_class_versus_desktop_class_hard_drives_.pdf